‘WHERE DO I FIND THE WORDS?’ (Lk 4:14-22): 10 January 2008 (Thursday)

‘WHERE DO I FIND THE WORDS?’ (Lk 4:14-22):  10 January 2008 (Thursday)

Reading:  www.nccbuscc.org/nab/011008.shtml

In the comic book, Preacher, Jesse Custer is a down-and-out alcoholic minister in the small town of Annville, Texas.  Traumatized by his religious fanatic mother, Jesse goes through a crisis in faith as he struggles with his own demons.

In one of his services, his sermon is interrupted by a being called Genesis, an angel/demon that has escaped from its prison and that decides to merge with him, causing a big fire that destroys his church and kills all his parishioners.  Jesse is the sole survivor, and he emerges from the ruins as some kind of superhero, Preacher, with a voice that has the power to command the obedience of anyone who hears him. Continue reading ‘WHERE DO I FIND THE WORDS?’ (Lk 4:14-22): 10 January 2008 (Thursday)

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“WOULD YOU WALK ON OUR SEA?” (Mk 6:45-52): 09 January 2008 (Black Nazerene of Quiapo, Wednesday)

“WOULD YOU WALK ON OUR SEA?” (Mk 6:45-52):  09 January 2008 (Black Nazerene of Quiapo, Wednesday)

Reading: www.nccbuscc.org/nab/010908.shtml

The Quiapo Church in Manila is home to the Nuestro Padre Jesus Nazareno, the life-sized, dark-skinned statue brought to the country from Mexico over 400 years ago.  Today, the 9th of January, is the Feast of the Black Nazarene, as the image is more popularly known.  The statue will be placed on a carriage and pulled through the streets of Quiapo by a rough exclusively-male procession.   Continue reading “WOULD YOU WALK ON OUR SEA?” (Mk 6:45-52): 09 January 2008 (Black Nazerene of Quiapo, Wednesday)

“HOW MANY LOAVES DO I HAVE?” (Mk 6:34-44): 08 January 2008 (Tuesday)

“HOW MANY LOAVES DO I HAVE?” (Mk 6:34-44):  08 January 2008 (Tuesday)

Reading:  www.nccbuscc.org/nab/010808.shtml

“An Inconvenient Truth,” Al Gore’s award-winning documentary on climate change, ranks high in my list of  scariest movies of all time.  In ways both lucid and graphic, the documentary shows us the magnitude of the problem, a problem caused by all the abuses committed against the planet.  Watching the film, some of us may actually feel helpless and resigned to our fate, whatever that will be. Continue reading “HOW MANY LOAVES DO I HAVE?” (Mk 6:34-44): 08 January 2008 (Tuesday)

“WHERE IS THE KINGDOM?” (Mt 4:12-17, 23-25): 07 January 2008 (Monday)

“WHERE IS THE KINGDOM?” (Mt 4:12-17, 23-25):  07 January 2008 (Monday)

Reading:  www.nccbuscc.org/nab/010708.shtml

The Black Eyed Peas’ music video for their hit “Where Is the Love?” begins with an intriguing close-up of a red question mark.  As the music rises, the camera zooms out to reveal that it’s a piece of crumpled poster clutched by someone running.  Soon we see the mysterious question mark being posted all over the city–on street signs, on walls, on moving vehicles, on banners, even on people’s arms, as more and more people of different age and color repeatedly sing the chorus in increasing intensity:  “Where is the love?”  Continue reading “WHERE IS THE KINGDOM?” (Mt 4:12-17, 23-25): 07 January 2008 (Monday)

“WHO COMES BEARING GIFTS?” (Mt 2:1-12): 06 January 2008 (Epiphany of the Lord, Sunday)

“WHO COMES BEARING GIFTS?” (Mt 2:1-12):  06 January 2008 (Epiphany of the Lord, Sunday)

Reading:  www.nccbuscc.org/nab/010608.shtml

We know the saying, “Beware of Greeks bearing gifts.” It’s a reference to the story of the Trojan War.   For ten years, the Greeks waged war against Troy, but for many reasons couldn’t win it. Then Odysseus devised a clever plan:  They built a giant hollow wooden horse outside the walls of Troy, and pretended to leave it as a peace offering.  Against the advice of their seers, the Trojans accepted the gift and held a night of revelry to celebrate the end of the ten-year siege.  Unknown to them, the  wooden horse was filled with hundreds of Greek soldiers, who in the dark of night climbed out of their hiding place when the entire city was in a drunken stupor.  They opened the gates of the city to let the other Greeks in.  Needless to say, the entire city of Troy was destroyed.  Hence, the warning about Greeks and deadly gifts. Continue reading “WHO COMES BEARING GIFTS?” (Mt 2:1-12): 06 January 2008 (Epiphany of the Lord, Sunday)

“HOW DO YOU KNOW ME?” (Jn 1:43-51): 05 January 2008 (John Neumann, Saturday)

“HOW DO YOU KNOW ME?” (Jn 1:43-51): 05 January 2008 (John Neumann, Saturday)

Reading: www.nccbuscc.org/nab/010508.shtml

In 2002 Mary Zimmerman won the Tony Award for Best Director for her work on “Metamorphosis,” a play based on a number of Ovid’s fables.  In one scene, Zeus and Hermes disguise themselves as ordinary peasants, and they visit a village knocking on doors to ask for a place to stay.  Every house closes its door on them, and after a while, Hermes tries to convince Zeus to give up.  But Zeus insists they continue and they end up before the simple cottage of Baucis and Philemon, a poor elderly couple, who–to the gods’ surprise–immediately welcome the strangers and serve them food and wine.  Suspiciously, Zeus asks them if they recognize them. “Of course!” exclaims Philemon. “You are children of God!”  But later Philemon notices that although he has already refilled his guests’ cups many times, the wine pitcher remains full.  At this point, the scene’s several narrators declare to the audience in unison:  “And then they knew.”  Baucis cries out, “Mercy, mercy!” and she and Philemon fall on their knees before the gods they finally recognize.   Continue reading “HOW DO YOU KNOW ME?” (Jn 1:43-51): 05 January 2008 (John Neumann, Saturday)

“WHAT AM I LOOKING FOR?” (Jn 1:35-42): 04 January 2008 (Elizabeth Ann Seton, Friday)

“WHAT AM I LOOKING FOR?” (Jn 1:35-42):  04 January 2008 (Elizabeth Ann Seton, Friday)

Reading:  www.nccbuscc.org/nab/010408.shtml

There is an interesting and moving scene in J,K. Rowling’s first book, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.  In one of the dark and mysterious chambers of Hogwarts, Harry chances upon a dark and mysterious mirror, a mirror unlike any mirror he has ever seen before, a mirror that shows more than just one’s reflection.
Continue reading “WHAT AM I LOOKING FOR?” (Jn 1:35-42): 04 January 2008 (Elizabeth Ann Seton, Friday)

‘WHERE IS THE LAMB OF GOD?’ (Jn 1:29-34): 03 January 2008 (Thursday)

‘WHERE IS THE LAMB OF GOD?’ (Jn 1:29-34):  03 January 2008 (Thursday)

Reading:  www.nccbuscc.org/nab/010308.shtml

In today’s gospel reading, John the Baptist sees the Lord and identifies him to the crowd with the words, “Behold the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!”

My question for the day is:  “Where is the Lamb of God in the world today?  If we are to play the role of John the Baptist, where can we find the Lord?” Continue reading ‘WHERE IS THE LAMB OF GOD?’ (Jn 1:29-34): 03 January 2008 (Thursday)

‘WHAT’S THE SOUND OF MY VOICE?’ (Jn 1:19-28): 02 January 2008 (Saint Basil the Great and Saint Gregory Nazianzen, Wednesday)

‘WHAT’S THE SOUND OF MY VOICE?’  (Jn 1:19-28):  02 January 2008 (Saint Basil the Great and Saint Gregory Nazianzen, Wednesday)

Reading: www.nccbuscc.org/nab/010208.shtml

Last month, I got myself an avatar and was born into Second Life, a virtual world that’s growing and spreading very fast.  I was curious about this virtual 3D universe, where the residents–as the members are called–build almost everything you find there:  every object, every building, etc.  It also had a lot of potential for education, so I wanted to learn more about it. Continue reading ‘WHAT’S THE SOUND OF MY VOICE?’ (Jn 1:19-28): 02 January 2008 (Saint Basil the Great and Saint Gregory Nazianzen, Wednesday)

“WHAT DO YOU SEE?” (Lk 2:16-21): 01 January 2008 (Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God. Tuesday)

“WHAT DO YOU SEE?” (Lk 2:16-21):  01 January 2008 (Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God.  Tuesday)

Reading:  www.nccbuscc.org/nab/010108.shtml

Among the many images of Mary as the Mother of God, this 12th-century icon of the Virgin of Vladimir is my personal favorite.  One of the most venerated icons in Russia, it is also known as the Icon of Tenderness not only because Mary holds her child with great tenderness, but also because the child wraps his arm around his mother’s neck and tenderly presses his cheek against hers.   Continue reading “WHAT DO YOU SEE?” (Lk 2:16-21): 01 January 2008 (Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God. Tuesday)