ONLINE HOLY WEEK RETREAT 2016

In this Jubilee Year of Mercy, our online Holy Week retreat this year is called “THE THREE DOORS TO MERCY: THE UPPER ROOM, THE CITY, AND HELL.”

3Doors2

This Holy Week, three special doors lead to God’s mercy. They are found in the Upper Room, the City of Jerusalem, and Hell.

Each of these doors will open on Holy Thursday, Good Friday, and Black Saturday. Learn about these virtual doors of mercy. Find the key to each of them, and walk through them.

Begin with a short Pre-Retreat Exercise. This will take about five minutes. Click HERE.

If you have friends you’d like to invite to the retreat, send them here or ask them to register HERE.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Our online retreat will feature video clips and music, so it would be ideal if you can make sure you have your earphones/speakers.

HOLY THURSDAY RETREAT
Available by 08:00 am (UTC+8, PH Time)

on 24 March 2016
Click HERE

GOOD FRIDAY RETREAT
Available by 08:00 am (UTC+8, PH Time)

on 25 March 2016
Click HERE

BLACK SATURDAY/EASTER SUNDAY RETREAT
Available by 08:00 am (UTC+8, PH Time)
on 26 March 2016
Click HERE

LISTEN TO THE STONES

This Palm Sunday homily is based on Luke 19:28-40.

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The liturgy of Palm Sunday is marked by the jubilant waving of palm leaves and the somber reading of the Passion narrative.

Talk about contrasts!

To the cheers of the crowd, our Lord enters the city of Jerusalem, riding a humble donkey. He does that not only to fulfill Scripture, but also to demonstrate the kind of kingdom he is inaugurating. In just a few days, Jesus will be exiting the same gate with the same crowd singing to a different tune: A total failure by every appearance, Jesus marches to a brutal death reserved for the worst criminals of the Roman Empire.

Continue reading LISTEN TO THE STONES

A THEORY OF DIVINE MERCY

woman-in-red_1408671_inlThis homily, delivered at St. Agnes Catholic Church, is based on John 8:1-11.

Today we are presented with what I consider one of the defining moments in the public ministry of our Lord. A woman caught in the act of adultery is dragged into the temple square to stand in shame and in full view of a blood-thirsty mob. She stands alone because her presumably equally culpable accomplice is conspicuously missing.

It’s a disturbingly familiar scene: To this day, such tragic injustice continues to be inflicted on women in different parts of the world. Unfortunately, while it takes two to tango, it only takes one when you want to condemn the dance–and it’s usually not the man you haul to the public stoning. Continue reading A THEORY OF DIVINE MERCY

MY PROBLEM WITH THIS PARABLE

Rembrandt's The Prodigal Son
Rembrandt’s The Prodigal Son

This homily is based on Luke 15:1-32.

Our Gospel reading today features what is arguably the best-known and best-loved of our Lord’s parables, The Parable of the Lost Son–more commonly known as the Prodigal Son.

We know the story: A wayward son prematurely asks his father for his share of the inheritance and spends it all in loose living. He predictably finds himself destitute and miserable, and just as predictably decides to go home in remorse. What is most unpredictable is that this good-for-nothing son is, much to his own surprise, greeted by his father’s embrace and is welcomed with a lavish homecoming party, complete with a roasted fattened calf.

Continue reading MY PROBLEM WITH THIS PARABLE