MEN OF EXCESSES

875px-Greco,_El_-_Sts_Peter_and_PaulThis reflection is based on Matthew 16:13-19 on the Solemnity of Sts. Peter and Paul.

At first glance, lumping Peter and Paul together in one feast in the Church seems pretty strange. After all, there was a time in history when these two Jews, who could not have come from more different backgrounds, found themselves on opposite sides of a conflict.

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BODY AND BLOOD

nail-pierced-handThis reflection is based on John 6:51-58 for the Solemnity of the Most Precious Body and Blood of Christ.

My first thought whenever I hear of the Solemnity of the Corpus Christi is the Mass bread and wine. And why not? We Catholics believe that at the Consecration, the bread and wine are transformed not just into a symbol of Christ’s presence, but to His actual body and blood. You may not understand it, or you may even choose not to believe it, but it’s not a shocking idea at all. Continue reading BODY AND BLOOD

TWO TAKES ON the TRINITY

This reflection was made on the Feast of the Most Holy Trinity, based on John 3:16-18.

rublev-trinity-iconSomeone emailed me a couple of articles written by Fr. Peter Knauer, a German Jesuit philosopher and theologian. He writes about the mystery of God–how what we know about God, whether from reason or even from revelation, is much, much less than what we don’t know about Him.

This is a common insight among mystics–those people among us who have been blessed with such an intense prayer life that they have acquired an intimate knowledge of God. From them we would expect a great familiarity with God. But their consensus has been that the closer they get to approach God, they sense, more than ever, their own sinfulness. More than that, the more they get to know God, the more they realize they know so little about Him. The reason is that God is simply that holy and that infinite; His ways are just way beyond us!

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POETRY, PENTECOST, AND THE PAINS OF THE PASSING YEARS

GMHThis reflection was made on the occasion of Pentecost Sunday, which this year falls on 08 June, the death anniversary of the English Jesuit poet Gerard Manley Hopkins.

I read my first Hopkins poem as a freshman in high school. The poem was “God’s Grandeur” contained in an anthology of poems carefully selected and compiled for us by our English teachers.

But between me and Hopkins, it wasn’t a case of love at first sight. An adolescent who had barely learned to appreciate any kind of poetry, I found his language and style too alien. And for some reason, the verses he wrote were much less accessible to me than the better known and more frequently quoted poems about roads less taken, tigers burning bright, and even that one creepy raven.

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